Nov 052017
 

Discovering the Miracle Tree

 

Moringa-crops-Wildmoz.com

Moringa Crops

 

Can you live on moringa?

Seeing there are other types of moringa trees, it is necessary to determine our tree as moringa oleifera, considering the habits of this plant lend itself to cropping.  Some scientists have claimed that moringa oleifera is indigenous to Africa, in and around the Abyssinian region.

Although this may be true, it won’t matter to our story, because we are not talking about indigenous Africa, but rather about a crop. Tradition says moringa came from India or the Middle East where it does occur in fair abundance, but it actually originated from the Himalayas, forming India’s northern boundary with China.

Wherever it came from is of no consequence, unless you are a conservationist – or under conservation laws – and want to plant moringa oleifera in your garden etc.

This article is all about the uses of the moringa tree and how the average homeowner can make use of it. Our reason is simply philanthropic and downright good sense, considering the price of moringa supplements nowadays and its general health values.

Your main question may be, “does it work?” Good question. And this is the one side of this article, while the other is how to grow and generally make good use of this miracle plant.

The facts presented here on Wildmoz are not our own and we make no claims of such.

Wildmoz cannot advise where to obtain moringa in its various forms. This article is intended to tell you how to grow it yourself for the most benefits.

You may like to know, the moringa plant is being used by many missionaries, charities and NGO’s for combating of malnutrition, particularly among infants and nursing mothers. Moringa is also grown and used to feed the starving masses throughout favorable climates, up and down Africa, as a nutritious food source year-round.

Nutritional Value

 

Fresh-Moringa-Properties-Wildmoz.com

Fresh moringa comparative chart

 

Dry-Moringa-Properties-Wildmoz.com

Dry moringa comparative chart

 
Enough can’t be said about this plant and its uses. From water purification to cancer cures. The food value of moringa is unmatched in any other plant we as humans can crop grow. Get seeds, plant a patch, water, cut and come again as many times as you need food or health. You can treat this plant like spinach, because when you let it get too large, it gets out of proportion in the same way spinach does.
 

Moringa-seedlings-Wildmoz.com

Moringa seedlings

 
If you prefer, you can grow a tree or two, but remember it is frost tender so if you have frost, make the necessary plans. For most people, growing moringa in a flowerbed or veggie patch is best. Keep it cropped and don’t let the plants grow above ½ a meter – 18 inches – for a tidy, useful crop. If you opt for the flowerbed method, which I find best, then set your plants no more than 150 mm – 6 inches – apart.
 

Moringa-leaves-Wildmoz.com

Moringa leaves.

 
You can pinch and train your plants to produce more of a leafy structure and when your plants get to 300 mm – 12 inches – tall cut them down to 150 mm – 6 inches – tall, then strip off the leaves by hand. With your bundle of fresh leaves, you have food for salads, cereal, soups, vegetable dishes or curries.

If you decide to dry your leaves, you have food and health benefits for the future, out of your own little patch. All of this plant is edible from the roots to the tip, including the seed pods, whereas the seeds, if left to mature, yield a very useful oil, called ‘ben oil’. The roots have been used as a horse radish substitute in many cultures, but be careful here, too much can be toxic, so on this score, get to know your product.

I hope we have whetted your appetite for planting your own patch of moringa. If so, follow the links below for more research.

www.moringanews.org/documents/moringawebEN.pdf

https://easioyya.com/how-to-grow-moringa-in-your-home-garden/

Video run time: 8:05 minutes.

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Meet Our Authors: The Wildmoz team, Cari and Moz, have a lifelong passion for the Bushveld and share adventures and stories about Africa's good things. Wildmoz is Africa - the cradle of life! Travel writing about wildlife, African folklore, wildlife art, Kruger Park and wildlife safari info! Taste life as it is in Africa.
 Posted by on November 5, 2017
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